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Hampton Creek Explains To The FDA That “Mayo” Is Not Necessarily “Mayonnaise”

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justmayoHampton Creek, the company behind an eggless product called “Just Mayo,” has responded to the Food and Drug Administration’s warning that its product isn’t mayonnaise, and thus, shouldn’t be called “mayo.” That seems just fine by Hampton Creek, which recently responded to the FDA by agreeing with it.

The company acknowledges in a response obtained by Business Insider through a Freedom of Information Act request that the FDA is right — its product isn’t mayonnaise, it’s mayo. And “mayo” is not a regulated term, so its label is completely correct.

“The term ‘mayo’ should not now be held to the regulatory standard for ‘mayonnaise,'” wrote the company’s lawyer, Josh Schiller.

See, mayonnaise is defined by the FDA as a mixture of vegetable oil, vinegar, egg yolk, and lemon juice. Which means if you’re going to put a product on the shelf with the word “mayonnaise” on the label, it had better contain those ingredients.

But Hampton Creek argues that there’s no definition for mayo, because the FDA excluded that word in its definition when the federal regulations governing labels went into place in 1976:

“While there is a food standard of identity for ‘mayonnaise,’ there is no current standard for ‘mayo,'” the company wrote in its reply to the FDA. “Hampton Creek does not use the term ‘mayonnaise’ on any of its products or any of its marketing materials … If FDA had intended to cover products that use the term ‘mayo’ in its standard for mayonnaise, it could have done so, yet it did not.”

The FDA had also taken issue with Hampton Creek’s use of the word “Just” on the label, saying that it implied that the product contained only mayonnaise. But the company said that on that front, the “just” pertains to how it manufactures its products, reducing land use, water use, and carbon emissions while creating an allergy-free product. In this case, “Just” means “fair,” not “only.”

Hampton Creek also urges the FDA to consider expanding its definition of mayonnaise — not that its product is mayonnaise! — to include new and more ecologically sustainable food production methods, thereby putting eggless products in the same category.

The company did acknowledge one change it’s making in light of the FDA’s August letter: it has updated Just Mayo labels to move its cholesterol-free claim to the appropriate location and will no longer imply on the label that its products can reduce the risk of heart disease.

The case is not listed as resolved on the agency’s website, BI notes, though communications between the two parties through Oct. 12 showed that the FDA and Just Mayo planned to meet.

Hampton Creek’s response to the FDA: Mayo is different than mayonnaise [Business Insider]

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elangomatt
2438 days ago
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If something looks like mayonnaise and tastes like mayonnaise does it become mayonnaise? I am far from a vegan or anything but Just Mayo legitimately tastes like mayonnaise to me and it definitely nails the texture. Maybe it's time for the FDA to change the definition of mayonnaise.

While mayo may be a widely accepted term for mayonnaise Hampton Creek does have a valid point about "mayo" not being in the FDA standards at all. If they are going against Hampton Creek then I really hope that the FDA is going for Spectrum Organics and Earth Balance companies as well since both companies have a vegan mayo marked with mayo on the label.
sjk
2438 days ago
In the case of Spectrum Organics "mayo", it says on the label that is clearly "eggless vegan plant-based" with no egg iconography on the label that might deceive customers. Earth Balance Mayo does not have egg iconography on the label, and it looks like it has text that says that it is egg, gluten, and preservative free (the text is off-center and not clear in the image on their website). Hampton Creek may have a case about the use of "mayo" on a technicality, but unlike other vegan egg-less mayos, they do not make it clear on the label that it is vegan egg-less.
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sjk
2438 days ago
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Hampton Creek must be completely insufferable people to be around. A reasonable person looking at the label seeing "Just Mayo" with iconography of eggs would definitely assume that the product is mayonnaise. Who does not use "mayo" as shorthand for "mayonnaise"? And "Just Mayo" would mean mayonnaise that it is pure mayonnaise and does not include unnecessary additives. However, Hampton Creek uses twisted logic to argue the opposite of the message that everyone receives from their product name and design.
Florida

Discrimination Lawsuit: Starbucks Fired Deaf Worker Who Asked For Sign Language Interpreters

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(Travelin' Librarian)

An Arizona woman who worked as a Starbucks barista for seven years has filed a lawsuit against the company for allegedly discriminating against her because she’s deaf. She claims she repeatedly asked for reasonable accommodations to help her on the job and was repeatedly denied, and that she was finally fired because of her disability.

According to the lawsuit [PDF], the worker asked multiple times between March 2007 and January 2014 — when she was fired — for reasonable accommodations, such as sign language interpreters for staff meetings, training, and other important work events, and was denied in most instances.

“Between 2007 and 2014, [she] repeatedly requested reasonable accommodations to enable her to ensure effective communication, to perform the essential functions of her job, and to enjoy the benefits and privileges of employment,” the complaint states. “With these reasonable accommodations, [the plaintiff] would have been able to perform the essential functions of her job, such as taking customers’ orders at the front counter and at the drive-thru.”

After meeting with management and insisting on interpreters, she claims she was later fired as retaliation for filing a charge of discrimination with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. She says she was told she was fired having visible tattoos — which she’d had for the duration of her employment. Other workers also had visible tattoos, the lawsuit claims. And months later, Starbucks changed its anti-tattoo policy for employees.

The lawsuit alleges that the worker was a qualified individual with a disability who could perform the essential functions of her job with reasonable accommodations, but Starbucks refused to provide those reasonable accommodations to her.

“Defendant fired her in retaliation for participating in protected activities and on the basis of her disability,” the lawsuit claims, accusing Starbucks of violating the Americans with Disability Act.

She’s seeking compensatory damages, a permanent injunction to keep Starbucks from “engaging in unlawful employment practices that discriminate on the basis of disability in violation of the ADA,” and from engaging in retaliation against its employees for participation in protected activity. The lawsuit also wants Starbucks to create policies, practices and programs that provide equal employment opportunities “for individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing and which eradicate the effects of its past and present unlawful employment practices.”

It seems she’d also like to work for Starbucks again, as the complaint seeks a judgment that would reinstate her at her position, as well as pay her back pay and accrued sick leave or annual leave that she didn’t receive when she was fired.

“This case is not just about issues of accommodation; it’s about having the right to be treated fairly and equally in society,” attorneys for the ex-worker said.

Consumerist reached out to Starbucks for comment on the lawsuit, and will update this post if we hear back.

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elangomatt
2448 days ago
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It doesn't sound like the employee is asking for a full time interpreter every day. I think she just wants an interpreter for meetings, performance reviews, and other work related events. The woman worked at Starbucks for 7 years so obviously she could do most of her job without accommodation.

I doubt the slippery slope thing will happen if (when) the former employee wins. This is an Americans with Disabilities Act issue, not an I just can't speak English issue.
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sjk
2448 days ago
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SMDH. So, it is the responsibility of the employer to double their headcount so half the employees can do nothing but translate for the other half? If they win their lawsuit, then any non-English speaker can demand a translator. I think this is the solution to Obama's Great Recession woes. Unemployment will be virtually eliminated as the unemployed are employed as translators.
Florida

The Source

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Why did we even have that thing?
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elangomatt
2453 days ago
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My algebra teacher in HS had about 30 high-pitched hum generators in her classroom. They were called Apple 2e monitors. She laughed at me because every day I went to the computer area of the room to turn off monitors so I could concentrate. She couldn't hear it at all.
trekkie
2453 days ago
just got the shakes remembering that noise. Had forgotten about that.
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jeterhere
2451 days ago
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Hmmmmmm...
Kennewick, WA
infini
2453 days ago
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This is my basement
Asia, EU, Africa
Lythimus
2454 days ago
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If only it were that easy. I just wish employees actually cared when they were driving me away with their high-ptich hum generators.
alt_text_bot
2454 days ago
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Why did we even have that thing?
Brstrk
2454 days ago
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The instructions are clear. Now please someone finds this freaking machine stat.
JayM
2454 days ago
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Ha! :) Today's problem is universal. Wonder if there was a EMP recently... Hmmm.
Atlanta, GA
skittone
2454 days ago
Ha!

Think, people! How can we make our meetings even less productive?

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Says Lem in Queensland, Australia: “Everyone at my local council always says they’re super busy. I figure it’s because they’re ‘busy’ creating extra signs to put up around the office.”

Do you intend using this room? Have you correctly made a booking? Do you intend to correct your oversight by booking the room? Have you successfully booked the room? Will your meeting be productive?

related: More passive-aggressive flowcharts

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elangomatt
2515 days ago
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And to make matters worse the sign maker doesn't even know how to make a proper flowchart. The "will your meeting be productive" box should be before the "please proceed" box. They tried to add extra snark and messed up the entire flowchart!
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How dare they not be open whenever you want them!

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How dare they not be open whenever you want them!

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elangomatt
2519 days ago
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If they knew anything at all about Chic-fil-a, they wouldn't have waited until Sunday to go seeing as how most people know they are closed on Sundays
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Yellowstone Park Officials Reminding Visitors Not To Get Too Close To Animals Just To Get A Good Selfie

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That question your parents asked you at least once in your life is coming into play now at Yellowstone National Park: officials are warning visitors not to get too close to wild animals to get a good selfie, even if everyone else is doing it.

The thing about wild bison is, they’re wild, and as such, very unpredictable, park officials are now reminding visitors. The fifth person to be injured this year in the park after a confrontation with wild animals was trying to take a selfie with one of the huge beasts near a trail on Tuesday, reports CNN.

She and her daughter turned their backs on the bison, which was about six yards away, in order to grab a photo with it, the National Park Service said.

“They heard the bison’s footsteps moving toward them and started to run, but the bison caught the mother on the right side, lifted her up and tossed her with its head,” the park service said in a statement Wednesday. The woman had minor injuries.

Despite the fact that they’d read warnings about getting too close to wild animals, the family saw other people close to the bison so they decided that meant it was safe, a ranger said.

“The family said they read the warnings in both the park literature and the signage, but saw other people close to the bison, so they thought it would be OK,” the ranger said. “People need to recognize that Yellowstone wildlife is wild, even though they seem docile. This woman was lucky that her injuries were not more severe.”

Park authorities tell visitors to keep at least 25 yards between themselves and large animals like bison, and a full 100 yards away from bears and wolves.

“Bison can sprint three times faster than humans can run and are unpredictable and dangerous,” park officials warn.

Bison attacks woman who was trying to take selfie with it in Yellowstone Park [CNN]

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elangomatt
2523 days ago
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This applies to rattlesnakes as well... http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/rattlesnake-selfie-hospital-bill_55b38198e4b0a13f9d18bf80
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angelchrys
2537 days ago
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You'd think this would be obvious, and yet...
Overland Park, KS
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